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    Archived pages: 120 . Archive date: 2012-11.

  • Title: Medicinal Plants of the Southwest
    Descriptive info: .. The Medicinal Plants of the Southwest (MPSW) program, is funded by the National Institute of Health as part of the Research Initiative for Scientific Enhancement (RISE) Program at NMSU.. The goal of the MBRS RISE program is to increase the number of minority students pursuing and obtaining advanced degrees in the biomedical sciences.. Program Goals.. 10th Summer Workshop (pdf).. May 24 July 2, 2010.. Recommendation  ...   Coordinator.. Office: Foster Hall Room 369.. Phone: 646-5726.. Email:.. rise@nmsu.. edu.. Website:.. http://biology-web.. nmsu.. edu/nmsurise/.. List of Plants.. List of Diseases Commonly Treated with Plants.. Selected Workshop Lesson Plans.. (pdf).. From Curanderas to Chromatography.. Additional Links.. WWW.. medplant.. To email us add @nmsu.. edu after moconnel.. Updated February 13, 2008.. Home |.. Goals |.. Plants.. |.. Diseases.. Publications |.. Database |.. Search |.. Resources.. Links |..

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  • Title: Medicinal Plants of the Southwest
    Descriptive info: Goals.. Workshop |.. Plants.. Resources |.. By: Alice M.. Nevarez and Andrea Medina.. DAILY LOG FOR CHEMISTRY/DETECTOR PORTION OF MEDICINAL PLANTS OF THE SOUTHWEST 2004.. Medicinal Plants of the Southwest (.. MPSW.. ), is funded by the National Institute of Health , and is part of the larger Minority Biomedical Research Support (.. MBRS.. ) Research Initiative for Scientific Enhancement (.. RISE.. ) Program.. The goal of the.. MBRS RISE.. program is to increase the number of minority students pursuing and obtaining advanced degrees in the biomedical sciences.. provides students a chance to explore their natural world.. By studying native plants, students learn how field and laboratory science can strengthen their academic skills and expand their career opportunities.. Students have the opportunity to participate in summer workshops and academic year activities.. Students have published some of  ...   proper storage protocol.. Students research other cultural uses for plant organs.. Students separated methyleugenol, an active compound in.. Anemopsis californica.. This bar graph demonstrates the different yields using various extraction methods.. Students used analytical instruments to characterize the composition of different plant extracts.. In addition they learn how to isolate certain active compounds.. A GC-MS chromatogram of a methylene chloride extract of.. root, with assignment of peaks using a spectral library is shown.. MPSW students performed bioassays to test anti-microbial activity of crude plant extracts against several strains of bacteria.. Future participants will perform bioassays to test anti-viral (HIV and Hantavirus), anti-fungal, and anti-microbial activity of crude plant extracts.. Students will also study the effects of crude plant extracts on neuronal cell cultures.. Pseudomonas aeruginosa.. Bacillus subtilis.. Escherichia coli.. Ampicillin.. R.. S.. Chloramphenicol.. Carboxicillin.. Plant Extract.. Methanol..

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  • Title: Medicinal Plants of the Southwest
    Descriptive info: Medicinal Plants of the Southwest.. Phylum, Order, Family.. Scientific name.. Common name.. Agavaceae.. Agave spp.. Yucca spp.. Century plant, American aloe.. Anacardiaceae.. Rhus trilobata.. Skunkbush, Squawbush.. Asclepiadaceae.. Asclepias speciosa.. Milkweed.. Bignoniaceae.. Chilopsis linearis.. Desert Willow.. Brassicaceae.. Descurainia pinnata.. Stanleyella wrightii.. Campanulaceae.. Lobelia cardenalis.. Lopelia, Cardinal Flower, Red Lobelia, Indian Tobacco, Eye Bright.. Capparidaceae.. Cleome serrulata.. Rocky Mountain.. Beeplant.. Compositae.. Artemisia filifolia.. Brickellia.. Eupatorium herbaceum.. Gnaphalium palustre.. Gutierrezia longifolia.. Kuhnia goodingi.. Taraxacum officinale.. Tetradymia canescens.. Thelesperma megapotamicum.. Xanthium commune.. Prodigiosa, Bricklebush, Hamula, Atanasia, Mala Mujer, Rodigiosa, Tasselflower.. Silver Sage, Sand Sagebrush.. Boneset.. Cudweed, Everlasting Flower.. Skunk Weed, Snake Weed.. False Boneset.. Dandelion.. Black sage, Greasewood.. Navajo Tea, Hopi Tea, Cota.. Cocklebur.. Cucurbitaceae.. Curcurbita foetidissima.. Buffalo Gourd, Wild Pumpkin, Wild Gourd, Fetid,  ...   spp.. Cat's Claw.. Locust.. Mesquite.. Malvaceae.. Malva parviflora.. or.. neglecta.. -.. Sphaeralcea lobata.. -.. Mallow.. Yerba del Negra, Globe Mallow.. Pinaceae.. Abies concolor.. Pinus edulis.. White Fir.. Pinon, Nut Pine.. Polemoniaceae.. Gilia longiflora.. Gilly Flower, White Gilia.. Rosaceae.. Prunus americana.. Cercocarpus Montanus.. Wild Plum.. Mahogany, Mountain.. Rubiacea.. Galium aparine.. Cleavers, Goose grass, Bedstraw, Catchweed, tooth.. Salicaceae.. Populus tremuloides.. Aspen.. Sapindaceae.. Sapindus saponaria.. Soapberry.. Saururaceae.. Yerba Mansa, Lizard Tail.. Scrophulariaceae.. Penstemon ambiguus.. Penstemon torreyii.. Verbascum thapsus.. Penstemon Beardtounge.. Hummingbird Flower.. Mullein, Miner's Candle.. Solanaceae.. Capsicum.. Datura stramonium.. Datura metaloides.. Nicotiana attenuata.. Cayenne, African Pepper, Bird Pepper, Chili Pepper.. Jimsonweed.. Indian Apple.. Coyote Tobacco.. Umbelliferae.. Heracleum lanatum.. Cow Parsnip, Bear's Breeches.. Zygophyllaceae.. Kallstroemia brachysylis.. Larrea tridentata.. Contra Yerba, Burnut Leaves.. Creosote bush, Greasewood..

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  • Title: Medicinal Plants of the Southwest
    Descriptive info: Diseases with Plant.. Pharmacopeia.. Diseases.. Description.. Dysmenorrhea/.. Amenorrhea.. Dysmenorrhea is "by far the most common gynecologic problem for menstruating women.. " (Coco, Andrew).. Many women experience painful cramping in the lower abdomen,.. Migraine.. A common misconception of migraines is that they are just bad headaches, but actually migraines are a debilitating condition and can interfere with and hinder common, everyday tasks.. Asthma.. The word asthma is Greek, and generally in the past, it is said: The lungs suffer and the parts which assist respiration sympathize with them.. Cancer.. Stomach cancer is a disease of the gastric intestinal system in which the epithelial cells of the inner lining of the stomach grow unregulated forming a mass referred to as a tumor.. Dysthymia.. Dysthymia is a mild but chronic form of depression, in which the affected individual will experience two or three depressive symptoms over a period of more than two years.. Common Cold.. The common cold is an infection of the upper respiratory tract (URI)  ...   insulin properly.. Insomnia.. Insomnia is defined as a neurological disorder characterized by the inability to sleep at times when sleep is expected to occur.. Hypertension.. Hypertension, also known as high blood pressure is a major health problem in the United States and about five million people suffer from it.. Conjunctivitis.. Conjunctivitis is an inflammation of the conjunctiva.. "The conjunctiva is a thin, translucent, vascularized mucous membrane that covers the inner surface of the eyelids and the front of the eye, with exception of the cornea".. Pneumonia.. Pneumonia is caused by an infection or injury to the lower respiratory tract resulting in inflammation.. Infectious agents or injury caused by aspiration of dust or chemical agents causes fluid to enter the alveolar spaces.. Multiple Sclerosis.. Multiple Sclerosis is a disease of the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord) in which nerve impulses are slowed or prevented due to damaged myelin along nerve cell axons.. Strep_Throat.. The inflammation of the throat caused by either viruses or bacteria..

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  • Title: Medicinal Plants of the Southwest
    Descriptive info: American Indian Ethno botany Database.. - Foods, Drugs, Dyes, and Fibers of Native North American Peoples.. http://www.. umd.. umich.. edu/cgi-bin/herb.. American Indian Ethnobotany Databases.. edu/cgi~bin/herb/.. Ask Dr.. Weil.. Andrew Weil s homepage with tons of information on alternative healing practices.. Features a Q A, also has a large listing of alternative practitioners searchable by geographic location and specialty.. http://cgi.. pathfinder.. com/drweil/.. Health World Online.. information about alternative medicine.. healthy.. net/.. Healthfinder.. : A gateway to consumer health.. healthfinder.. gov/.. Henriette s Herbal Homepage.. lots of good links, herbal FAQ s (frequently asked questions) and pictures.. http://sunsite.. unc.. edu/herbmed/index.. html.. Herbal Hall.. a library for Herbs.. herb.. com/herbal.. htm.. HerbNET.. - information on herbs, herb products and remedies, herb publications, herb schools, etc.. herbnet.. com/.. Howie Brounstein s Home.. good herb information for beginners.. teleport.. com/~howieb/howie.. Internet Directory for Botany: Ethnobotany.. helsinki.. fi/kmus/botecon.. html#herbs.. Medicinal  ...   best herb schools in the area (located in Colorado), also offers some cool short workshops.. herbschool.. ROOTS N HERBS FARM.. an active research and education farm located 7 miles north of Questa, New Mexico.. laplaza.. org/comm/rnh/.. Southwest School of Botanical Medicine.. Home of Michael Moore.. Lots of great links and downloadable plant images and classic tests.. swsbm.. The American Botanical Council (ABC).. a nonprofit education organization whose goals are to educate the public about beneficial herbs and plants and to promote the safe and effective use of medicinal plants.. Publisher of Herbalgram.. herbalgram.. org/.. The hypertext version of A Modern Herbal.. , first published in 1931, by Mrs.. M.. Grieve, contains Medicinal, Culinary, Cosmetic and Economic Properties, Cultivation and Folk-Lore of herbs.. botanical.. com/botanical/mgmh/mgmh.. University of Washington cybercampus Medicinal Herb Garden.. a virtual herb garden located at university of Washington.. nnlm.. nlm.. nih.. gov/pnr/uwmhg/..

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  • Title: Medicinal Plants of the Southwest
    Descriptive info: NMSU-RISE.. Medicinal Plants of the Southwest Project Summer Workshop 2009.. ·.. The Medicinal Plants of the Southwest Summer Workshop (MPSW) is a student development activity designed to increase the educational opportunities for students at New Mexico State University.. MPSW is funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) through the NMSU RISE to the Doctorate Program.. The workshop is open to undergraduates at NMSU and recent high school graduates who are registered to attend NMSU in the Fall 2008 term.. Under-represented students (African American, Hispanic, Native American, Pacific Islander) are especially encouraged to.. apply.. as the goal of the NMSU-RISE program is to increase the number of ethnic minority researchers in the biomedical sciences.. NIH considers members of these.. groups “currently underrepresented in the biomedical, clinical, behavioral, and social sciences to include: (A) individuals from underrepresented racial and ethnic groups, (B) individuals with disabilities, and (C) individuals from socially, culturally, economically, or educationally disadvantaged backgrounds that have inhibited their ability to pursue a career in health-related research.. Institutions are encouraged to identify candidates who will increase diversity on a national or institutional basis.. nigms.. gov/Training/Diversity/.. Instruction and lab work will cover general principles in plant science, biochemistry,.. ethnobotany.. , cell biology, chemistry, and microbiology, using specific examples from medicinal plants.. Discussion groups will also cover scientific ethics Students will work in teams and perform research on a set of medicinal plants from the area.. Instructors include faculty and staff from NMSU.. The Summer 2009 Workshop will run for 6 weeks on the NMSU Las Cruces  ...   on the web.. Application.. description.. :.. pdf.. version.. RTF (rich text format).. Participation Requirements.. To be eligible for employment in this federally funded program,.. participants must be US citizens or permanent residents.. Must be enrolled at NMSU for Fall 2009 and satisfactorily completed High School courses in one or more of the following areas: Chemistry, Biology, or Physics.. The student should have a sincere interest in exploring a college major in: animal science, anthropology, biochemistry, biology, chemistry, genetics, physics, physiology, plant sciences, etc.. Opportunities are available for workshop participants to continue to participate in academic research programs sponsored by the NMSU-RISE training program year round.. For more information about the summer program please contact:.. Mary O'Connell (505) 646-5172 [to email: add @nmsu.. edu after.. moconnel.. ].. Morning Discussions.. Afternoon Research Activities.. Week 1.. Introduction - History of Medicinal Plants.. Overview of Modern Uses.. Plant Anatomy.. Technical Writing.. Organize Teams.. Learning Assistance Self-Testing.. Literature research- library and Internet.. Design Database.. Week 2.. Safety Issues.. Chemical Extractions.. Selection of Solvents.. Design experiments.. Harvest plant material.. Perform extractions.. Week 3.. Chemical Structures.. Run separations and analyses.. Continue literature research.. Publish web page on medicinal plant.. Week 4.. Analytical Instrumentation.. Refine extractions; repeat selected analyses.. Design bio-assays.. Week 5.. Biochemistry of plant 2.. nd.. products.. Set up bio-assays.. Statistical analyses of biomedical data.. Week 6.. Human Biology.. Microbiology.. Populate database.. Propose plants for future study.. Propose improvements in workshops.. Prepare.. poster reporting.. results from chemical and bioassay data for presentation at session on final day.. Updated February 17, 2009..

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  • Title: Medicinal Plants of the Southwest
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  • Title: Medicinal Plants of the Southwest
    Descriptive info: Taxonomy: Magnoliophyta (angiosperm), Liliopsida (monocot), Agavaceae, Yucca.. Common Names: Narrowleaf Yucca, Soaptree Yucca, Beargrass, Fineleaf Yucca, Yucca, Soapweed Yucca.. by Titrisa Nez, Bridges program, Summer 1999.. There are different species of Yucca everywhere in the Southwest.. These plants are easy to identify.. They have long and narrow leaves that are radiate from the base of the plant and they also have very sharp needle ends.. (photo by Zoncho Tso).. Right in the center of the Yucca plant there is usually a flower stalk (3-5ft.. long) that has lily-like flowers and fruit pods.. The fruit pods are 2-3 inches in length and and 1-2 inches in width.. Inside these fruits are seeds which are thin, black, and coarse.. The roots have a woody thick bark covering the outer layer and the core of the root is spongy.. Some Yucca species grow 10 to 13 ft.. tall.. They grow in dry and sandy deserts, mesas, and Plains.. Cultural Aspects.. Many Southwest tribes have used this plant for traditional purposes and a way of living.. Personally, being a Navajo Indian from the Diné Nation, my grandmother has used this plant in many amazing ways.. When I was younger she would gather yucca leaves and roots, soak them in water and washed my hair with it.. She would tell me that it would make my hair clean, strong and thicker.. Because the roots are hard to get to, she would use the leaves to get the soap and would use this on sunburns, scratches and cuts, also on dry cuticles around our fingernails.. For occasions, my grandmother would burn yucca leaves until it turned into ashes.. Then she would mix this  ...   (1st herbshop, 1999).. Many herbalists and healers used the yucca plant by boiling the roots for about half an hour and drinking it as tea.. Non-Medicinal Uses:.. Again in my Native tribe, we use this plant for arts crafts, food, dye to color fibers and yarn to make rugs also to make a black dye color for art in Indian basketry designs.. We used the yucca in a game called the Shoe Game (Moccasin Game) by using the yucca sticks (leaves) to keep the score, whoever ends up with all of the sticks (102 yucca leaves) wins the game! Navajos also use the yucca leaves as a whipping belt which are used by the sacred clowns in various ceremonies like the Night Chant Ceremony.. Some Navajos also use this to make yucca fruit rolls that are part of the Puberty Ceremony (a ceremony when a girl becomes a woman).. Active Ingredients:.. Steroidal saponin is a highly active compound found in yucca plants.. Saponins are precursors to cortisone and provide relief for symptoms of arthritis and rheumatism pain (Dr.. Larry Milam, H.. MD; 1999).. Rich in Vitamin A, B-complex, and Vitamin C, yucca is also a good source of copper, calcium, manganese, potassium, and fiber.. (Medicinal uses of herbs,1999).. digitonin, an example of a saponin.. [.. image from.. ChemFinder.. com.. References:.. Epple, Anne Orth and Lewis E.. Epple.. Plants of Arizona.. Lewann Publishing Co.. , Mesa, Arizona, 1995.. Moore, Michael.. Medicinal Plants of the Desert and Canyon West.. Museum of New Mexico Press.. Bulletin by Dr.. Larry Milan,H.. MD.. http://members.. aol.. com/greenmagik/osteo.. 1st herb shop for a healthy lifestyle.. 1stherbshop.. com/yucca/index.. Medical uses of herbs.. http://www2.. itexas.. net/~sparrow/aroma..

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  • Title: Medicinal Plants of the Southwest
    Descriptive info: Basic.. Information.. Medicinal.. Uses.. Non Medicinal.. Active.. Ingredients.. References.. Rhus trilobata Nutt.. Taxonomy: Anacardiaceae,.. Common names: Skunk-bush Sumac, Three-leaf Sumac, Stink-bush, Basket-bush, and Lemonade-bush.. By: Anthony Marquez, Titrisha Nez, Iva Tortalita, and Shonia Washburn.. Summer 2001.. There are several known species of the Rhus shrubs that are native to the Southwest.. Basic Information.. (.. view as a separate page.. ).. The growth and height pattern of the sumac shrub depends on the geographic location of the plant.. Sumac shrubs growing in the northern regions can reach 7 feet tall.. Shrubs in southern regions usually reach 4 feet in height and are round in shape.. (1).. Sumac shrubs have thicket branches and twigs that are long and flexible.. When branches are broken they have an unpleasant aroma which is why it is nicknamed the skunk-bush.. (7).. The flowers are small white/yellowish clusters that bloom in the spring.. (5,6).. The leaves are alternate and 3-6 cm long.. Each leaf has three leaflets which are variable in size and shape of the bush.. The leaves are green in the summer and turn red/orange in the fall.. (5,7,8).. The fruit of the sumac shrub have sticky, hairy berries that are red to orange in color.. These berries are acidic and have a smell similar to limes.. (1,5).. These shrubs grow in dry slopes, mesas, valleys, canyons, along streams, and in the mountains.. (1,6,8).. Back to Top.. Medicinal Uses.. separate page.. There are numerous medicinal uses of the.. documented today.. These uses vary with the part of the plant used, because different parts of the plant contain different chemicals (.. see - Active ingredients.. Several Native American tribes use only specific parts of the sumac.. Some of the known uses of the plant are as follows: (4).. Plant Organ.. Medicinal Use.. Bark.. Cold remedy, in which the bark is chewed and the juice is swallowed.. Oral aid, in which the bark is chewed.. Gynecological aid, in which the bark is boiled and the concoction  ...   be used as a string to sew up water containers.. Dry sumac leaves, mixed with tobacco, can be used for smoking.. The leaves are also used for ceremonial purposes.. Some tribes tend to use the sumac leaves during prayer as a symbol of protection.. Fruit berries are used for food and beverages.. Berries are boiled to make tea and also lemonade.. The lemonade can be consumed to refresh the body.. Mixed with corn meal, the berries are eaten as a porridge.. The berries are also used to make bread and cake.. All parts of the sumac can be used to make dyes for baskets and rugs.. The plant part selected depends on the desired color.. (4).. Active Ingredients.. Tannic and Gallic acids are active compounds found in Rhus trilobata.. (3) Tannic acids are found in the leaves and fruits of the sumac.. The properties of Tannic Acid are: (2).. Antibacterial.. Antidermatotic.. Antigingivitic.. Antihemorrhoidal.. Antiseptic.. Antiulcer.. Antiviral.. Gallic acid is found in the leaves of the sumac.. Biological activities of gallic acid include: (2).. Analgesic.. Antiallergenic.. Antibronchitic.. Anti-inflammatory.. Antioxidant.. Antiperoxidant.. Bacteristat.. Bronchodilator.. Immunosuppressant.. References.. Cerrillos Hills Park Coalition.. Threeleaf Sumac.. The Cerrillos Hills Historic Park Flora and Fauna.. cerrilloshills.. org/nature/shrubs.. htm#sumac.. Accessed on 20 June 2001.. Duke J, Beckstrom-Sternberg S.. 10 March 1998.. Gallic Acid, Tannic Acid.. Activities of a Specific Chemical query.. gov/duke/chem-activities.. Accessed on 15 July 2001.. Jamieson D, Shultes RE.. Ethnobotany of the Southwest Database.. http://anthro.. fortlewis.. edu/ethnobotany/Dbase/Plants/plant_browse.. asp.. Accessed on 2 July 2001.. Moerman DE.. Native American Ehtnobotany.. Portland, Oregan: Timber Press 1998.. 473-475 p.. North Dakota Tree Information Center.. Skunkbush or Lemonade Sumac.. North Dakota Tree Handbook.. ag.. ndsu.. nodak.. edu/adinfo/trees/handbook/th-3-55.. pdf.. Oklahoma Biological Survey.. Last Updated: 17 September 1999.. Catalog of the Woody Plants of Oklahoma.. biosurvey.. ou.. edu/shrub/rhtr.. Accessed on 8 June 2001.. Best Western Canyon de Chelly Inn.. canyondechelly.. com/sumac.. Native and Adapted plants for Utah Landscapes.. http://hort.. agsci.. usu.. edu/natives/shrubs/trilobata.. Photographs taken by Anthony Marquez and Andrea Medina.. Back to top..

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  • Title: Medicinal Plants of the Southwest
    Descriptive info: Chilopsis linearis.. Taxonomy.. Magnoliophyta (angiosperm), Magnoliopsida (dicot), Bignoniaceae.. Common Names.. Desert Willow, Flowering Willow, Willowleaf Catalpa, Desert Catalpa, Catalpa Willow, False Willow, Bow Willow, Mimbre, Jano (18).. By Jamie Ross, Polly Oliva, and Vanessa M.. Valdespino.. History.. The.. , more commonly known as the desert willow, is a native to the southwestern United States and Northern Mexico.. Its Linnaean name.. Chilopsis.. refers to the lip-like flower and.. linearis.. refers to the long narrow leaves.. Though its many common names refer to it as a willow, it is not related to the willow species.. This willow-like plant typically is a natural protector against flood and erosion damage.. Historically the desert willow has been used by the Pima to thatch roofs and for the enjoyment of the pleasant fragrance produced by the plant (12).. Medicinally this plant seems to have been ignored, though it has several potential medicinal uses it is not frequently used.. Ecological Characteristics.. Desert willow is found in moist areas and dry washes at a soil pH level of 6-9.. It is a shrub that can grow up to 30 feet tall and has leaves from 5 to 6 inches long.. This deciduous shrub has dark brown bark and trumpet-shaped flowers.. Flower color ranges between pink and violet with blooms occuring in May/June or later if the rainy season is promising (4).. Photo taken by Jamie Ross.. Propagation.. reproduces sexually; its purple trumpet-like flowers are attractive to many types of pollinators.. Though it has both male and female organs, it cannot pollinate itself, it must pollinate by outcrossing (4).. The long pods on the desert willow hold many seeds and each has several minuscule hairs that allow for easy wind dispersal.. The desert willows flowers, leaves, or bark can be used as a hot poultice or a soothing tea for coughing(13).. Other treatments guard against yeast infections, athlete s foot and a first-aid technique for scrapes and scratches.. The plant carries an additional use as an anti-fungal and anti-candida product (yeast).. The tea (from the flowers) produces a natural anti-oxidant, which promotes cardiovascular health and regulates glucose metabolism.. Non-Medicinal Uses.. Desert willow is a protective agent against soil erosion and flooding, as well  ...   fatty acids located in the chloroplast membrane.. High temperatures result in the reduction of the acid leading to a high tolerance for heat stress due to photosynthesis in the chloroplast membrane (7).. The enzyme responsible for trienoic fatty acids are still being researched for their usage in engineering crops to endure heat stress.. The leaves and branches contain alkanes, squalene and piperidine alkaloids.. Alkanes are found to strengthen immune defenses against fungi or bacteria (2).. Squalene, a hydrocarbon, is found in many health foods and is used variously by the cosmetic industry in moisturizers or emollient agents (9).. Piperidine alkaloids are derived from amino acids commonly found in nitrogen-containing bases (5).. The wood and bark also have a type of flavonoid referred to as lapachic acid or lapachol (alcohol functional group), which is found in other plants of the catalpa family, such as.. Tabebuia avellanedae.. Lapachol is currently being researched as an anti-tumor and anti-viral compound by the U.. S.. National Cancer Institute.. A derivative of lapachol, beta-lapachol, has been found to interfere with the replication of HIV-1, a virus that causes AIDS, thereby slowing the advancement of the disease (11).. Anthocyanin.. Squalene.. Lapachol.. Bibliography.. 1.. Arid Zone Trees.. Desert Willow.. aridzonetress.. com/aztimes/aztimes 95/sep95vol2-9.. Uvalde Research and Extension Center, Texas A M University System, Copyright 2000.. 3.. Gardner, Anna.. Department of Botany, Iowa University, Copyright 1998-2000.. 4.. U.. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station, Fire Sciences Laboratory, (2001, May).. Fire Effects Information System, [Online].. fs.. fed.. us/database/feis/plants/tree/chilin/.. 5.. Duke s Phytochemical and Ethnobotanical Database.. 6.. Forest Service.. Chemical of the Week The Chemistry of Autumn Colors.. us/news/fall.. shtml.. 7.. Murakami, Y.. , Tsuyama, M.. , Kobayashi,Y.. , Kodama, H.. , Iba, K.. Trienoic Fatty Acids and Plant Tolerance of High Tolerance.. Science, Vol.. 287, 476-479.. 21 Jan.. 2000.. biotech-info.. net/trienoic.. 8.. BoDD Botanical Dermatology Database.. BIGNONIACEAE.. 9.. Botany Online:.. The Secondary Metabolism of Plants Alkaloids.. 10.. Merk Index 10.. th.. Ed.. 5195.. 11.. Cyberbotanica:.. Beta-Lapachone and Lapachol.. Pharmacology of Beta-Lapachone and Lapachol.. http://biotech.. icmb.. utexas.. edu/botany/beta.. 12.. Rea.. , Amadeo M.. At the Desert's Green Edge: An Ethnobotany of the Gila River Pima.. The University of Arizona Press, Tuscon.. Copyright 1997.. 13..

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  • Title: Medicinal Plants of the Southwest
    Descriptive info: Lobelia cardinalis.. Lobeliaceae (Campanulaceae) Bellflower Family.. Common Name:.. Cardinal Flower, Scarlet lobelia, Lopelia, Red Lobelia, Indian Tobacco, Eyebright.. By:.. Malintze Gutierrez, Alberta Hayes Rosanna Washburn.. (Summer 2002).. HISTORY.. APPEARANCE.. HABITAT.. PROPAGATION.. DISTRIBUTION.. MEDICINAL USES.. CHEMICAL STRUCTURE.. REFERENCE.. © William S.. Justice.. http://plants.. usda.. The origin of the name, Lobelia cardinalis, was named after the Belgian botanist, Mathias de L Obel.. He often used a latinized form of his name Lobelius.. The name cardinalis was inspired by the color of the robes of the Roman Catholic cardinals.. Lobelia cardinalis was first found by explorers in Canada who sent the plant to France in the mid-1620 s.. English botanist John Parkins wrote the rich crimson cardinal flower it groweth neere the river in Canada, where the French plantation in America is seated from then on Lobelia cardinalis was known as the cardinal flower.. Appearance.. This Lobelia species stands tall and may grow from two to four feet if given plenty of water.. Its deep purplish stalk is thick, rigid and erect with very little flexibility.. An exception to this may occur during the flowering season when the weight of the flowers may cause the plant to tilt.. The alternating leaves of the cardinalis are medium-green and can grow as long as six inches.. These leaves are also pointy at both ends and are lance shaped.. When the Cardinal Flower blooms from late summer to mid-fall it draws attention because of its height and color.. Its scarlet florets are two-lipped and tubular with anthers that extend out over the lower lip.. Each flower can range in size from 30-45 mm and contains five bright-red petals that are velvety  ...   minimize the stress.. Finally, layering is the procedure of bending the stem horizontally along the ground and covering it with moist sand.. It forms roots at the nodes.. Distribution.. Plant Distribution by State.. Lobelia cardinalis L.. Alabama.. Indiana.. Mississippi.. P.. ennsylvania.. Arizona.. Iowa.. Missouri.. Rhode Island.. Arkansas.. Kansas.. Nebraska.. South Carolina.. California.. Kentucky.. New Hampshire.. Tennessee.. Colorado.. Louisiana.. New Jersey.. Texas.. Connecticut.. Maine.. New Mexico.. Utah.. Delaware.. Maryland.. New York.. Vermont.. Florida.. Massachusetts.. North Carolina.. Virginia.. Georgia.. Michigan.. Ohio.. W.. Illinois.. Minnesota.. Oklahoma.. Wisconsin.. Lobelia cardinalis not found.. Lobelia cardinalis is found.. In the past, several native populations such as the Iroquois, Delaware, Cherokee and Meskwaki used Cardinal Flower.. It is used medicinally as well as ceremonially.. Lobelia cardinalis is the best herb for bronchial spasms.. The leaves and flowers have strong antispasmodic effects on the bronchials when smoked at the first signs of spasms.. Lobelia is used as a sedative, which depresses spinal chord function excessively.. Lobeline is an active respiratory stimulant, which relieves the bronchial spasms.. It can be found in the leaves and seeds.. Properties.. How its used.. Analgesic, Anthelmintic, Antispasmodic, and Stomachic.. A tea made from roots has been used in the treatment of epilepsy, syphilis, typhoid, stomachaches, cramps, and worms.. Analgesic and Febrifuge.. A tea made from leaves is used for treatment of croup, nosebleeds, colds, fevers, and headaches.. Chemical Structure:.. Lobeline.. [90-69-7].. C.. 22.. H.. 27.. NO.. Reference.. Medicinal Plants of the Mountain West.. The Museum of New Mexico Press.. Santa Fe,.. New Mexico, 1979.. p.. 98.. www.. auburn.. edu/~deancar/wfnotes/carfl.. gov.. calflora.. org.. http://florawww.. eeb.. uconn.. edu/acc_num/199800112.. medicinegarden.. gardenbed.. com/39/3833 pro.. badbear.. com/dkramb/wildflowers/LobeliaCardinalis.. com/39/3833 med.. asp.. bbg.. org/gar2/topics/wildflower/1999fa_cardinal.. chemfinder..

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  • Archived pages: 120